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by Dinesh Thakur Category: Basic of Computer Graphics

Since large drawings cannot fit in their entirety on display screens, they can either be compressed to fit, thereby obscuring details and creating clutter, or only a portion of the total drawing can be displayed. The portion of a 2D or 3D object to be displayed is chosen through specification of a rectangular window that limits what part of the drawing can be seen.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Basic of Computer Graphics

Pictures on a computer display or the process of creating pictures on a computer display. The term came into use when there was still a distinction between computers that could display only text and those that could also display pictures. This distinction is lost now that almost all computers employ a GRAPHICAL USER INTERFACE.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Basic of Computer Graphics

A technique called double buffering permits one set of data to be used while another is collected. It is used with graphics displays, where one frame buffer holds the current screen image while another acquires the bits that will make up the next image. When it is ready, the buffers are switched, the new screen is displayed, and the process continues. 

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Basic of Computer Graphics

If an item is monochrome, that means it uses only one color on a differently colored background. In a monochrome monitor, these pixels have only one color phosphor. The picture is created with, say, black dots (or lines) against a white background. A monochrome image pixel can have two values, on (white) or off (black), and this can be represented by 1-bit as either 0 or 1. Most printers are monochrome, meaning they only print black toner on white paper.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Basic of Computer Graphics

On a grayscale monitor, each pixel can accept from 1 to 8 bits of data, which will show from 1 to 256 shades of gray.

If there are 2 bits per pixel, there are four possible combinations of on and off: on/on, off/off, on/off, and off/on. Each of these combinations displays a different shade of gray (including black and white).

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Basic of Computer Graphics

On a color monitor, each pixel has three dots arranged in a triad-red, green, and one blue dot. Each dot can deal with a maximum of 8 bits, which makes a total of 24 bits per pixel. With the possibility of combining the 256 levels of color in each of the three color dots, 24-bit color gives you the awesome potential of 16.7 million colors on your screen (256 times 3). Many of these colors differ so slightly that even the most acute observer couldn't tell the difference between them. Simply stated: 16 million colors is more than enough. (How do you get black and white if there are three colored dots? If all dots are on, the pixel is white; if all dots are off, the pixel is black.)

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Basic of Computer Graphics

Built into your computer is a mapping system, or grid, complete with the ability to pinpoint any location or coordinate in the application window. This grid is laid out in the common x,y format-x being the horizontal units of measure starting from the left side of the screen, and y being the units starting from the top of the screen. It's easy to see that 0,0 would be the upper left corner of the screen. Now, if you're only using your computer for word processing, then you have no real use for knowing exactly where your cursor is. But in the painting and drawing world, knowing these coordinates is very helpful-to say the least-and it's essential in a lot of instances. Nearly all graphic and page layout applications give you a separate window which shows the coordinates of where your cursor is located at any given moment. By watching your coordinates you can move, create, shape, or select objects or portions thereof with great precision.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Basic of Computer Graphics

CLUT stands for color look-up table. A CWT is a software palette or set of 256 colors (it's actually a resource) that resides within the system software and most color-capable applications. On a computer with 8-bit color (those that are only capable of displaying a total of 256 colors), a CWT is a necessary reference to let the computer know which 256 colors out of the available 16.7 million colors (24-bit color) it can use at one time. If you think of all those 16.7 million colors as being a big (ok, very big) box of crayons, you can visualize a CWT as being a small box of handpicked colors that someone has handed you to work with. Many applications give you the option of choosing which 256 colors you want to work with. You often can set up your own palette for each particular file. For instance, if you were painting a picture of a man's face, a palette of 256 different flesh tones would be more useful than a palette containing 256 colors found in the range between black and burgundy. Take the time to explore your particular application and its documentation for a variable palette feature.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Basic of Computer Graphics

Dithering is a trick many graphic applications use to fool your eye into seeing a whole lot more colors (or grey tones) on the screen than are really there. The computer achieves this optical illusion by mixing together different colored pixels (tiny dots on the screen that make up an image) to trick the eye into thinking that a totally new color exists. For instance, since pixels are so tiny, if the computer intermingles a series of black with white dots then you're going to think you're seeing gray.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Basic of Computer Graphics

The acronym CMYK (pronounced as the individual letters: CM Y K) stands for the process colors cyan, magenta, yellow, and black. These four process colors are the transparent ink colors that a commercial press uses to recreate the illusion of a full-color photograph or illustration on the printed page. If you look at any printed color image in a magazine, especially if you look at it through a magnifying glass (a "loupe"), you will see separate dots of ink in each of the four colors. These four colors, in varying intensities determined by the dot size and space around the dot, combine together to create the wide range of colors you appear to see.

 

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About Dinesh Thakur

Dinesh ThakurDinesh Thakur holds an B.SC (Computer Science), MCSE, MCDBA, CCNA, CCNP, A+, SCJP certifications. Dinesh authors the hugely popular Computer Notes blog. Where he writes how-to guides around Computer fundamental , computer software, Computer programming, and web apps. For any type of query or something that you think is missing, please feel free to contact us.



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