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by Dinesh Thakur Category: Two Dimensional Transformations

1. Translation: A translation is applied to an object by repositioning it along a straight line path from one coordinate position to another. We translate a 2-D point by adding translation distances tx & ty, to the original coordinate position ( x, y) to move the point to a new position (x? , y?)
X? = x + tx , y? = y + ty.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Two Dimensional Transformations

A surface that is not exposed directly to a light source still will be visible if nearby objects are illuminated. In our basic illumination model, we can set a general level of brightness for a scene. This is a simple way to model the combination of light reflections from various surfaces to produce a uniform illumination called the ambient light, or background light.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Two Dimensional Transformations

The various techniques used are:


1) Graphics monitors for the display of three-dimensional scenes have been devised using a technique that reflects a CRT image from a vibrating, flexible mirror. In this system, as the mirror vibrates, it changes focal length.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Two Dimensional Transformations

1. Optical Touch Panel: Optical touch panels employ a line of infrared light-emitting diodes (LEDs) along one vertical edge and along one horizontal edge of the frame. The opposite vertical and horizontal edges contain light detectors. These detectors are used to record which beams re interrupted when the panel is touched.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Two Dimensional Transformations

To understand what rasterizing does, first you need to know a little about the images in the computer: Bitmapped (raster) graphics and fonts are created with tiny little dots. Object-oriented (vector) graphics and fonts are created with outlines. Output devices, like printers (except for some plotters) and monitors can only print or display images using dots, not outlines. This means that when an object-oriented graphic or font is output to a printer that prints in dots per inch (as most of them do) or to a monitor that displays in pixels (as most of them do), the outlines must be turned into dots. This process of turning the outlines of the objects into dots is called rasterizing. Everything you see on your monitor has been rasterized. Everything you print has been rasterized.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Two Dimensional Transformations

The process by which CONTINUOUS TONE photographs are reproduced in print (for example in newspapers and magazines) by reducing them to a grid of tiny dots. (The resulting image is also commonly known as a halftone.) Each individual dot is printed using a single coloured ink of fixed intensity, and the intensity of colour the reader perceives is controlled by varying the size and density of the dots to reveal more or less of the underlying white paper.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Two Dimensional Transformations

A problem with the Painter's and Z-Buffer Algorithms is that they ignore the effects of the light source and use only the ambient light factor. Flat shading goes a bit further and includes the diffuse reflections as well. For each of the planar pieces, an intensity value is calculated from the surface normal, the direction to the light, and the ambient light and diffuse coefficient constants. Since none of these changes at any point on the piece, all of the pixels in that piece will have the same intensity value. The resulting image will appear to be faceted, with ridges running along the boundaries of the pieces that make up an object.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Two Dimensional Transformations

An extra layer of information stored in a digital picture to describe transparency or opacity. For each pixel, the alpha channel stores an extra value called alpha, in addition to its red, blue and green values, which indicates the degree of transparency of that pixel.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Two Dimensional Transformations

An algorithm employed in 3D GRAPHICS to fool the eye into seeing as a smoothly curving surface an object that is actually constructed from a mesh of polygons. Gouraud's algorithm requires the colour at each vertex of a polygon to be supplied as data, from which it INTERPOLATES the colour of every PIXEL inside the polygon: this is a relatively fast procedure, and may be made faster still if implemented in a hardware GRAPHICS ACCELERATOR chip. 

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Two Dimensional Transformations

Early computer-generated images used shaded objects that had unnaturally smooth surfaces. To produce a textured surface using the techniques discussed would require creating an excessive number of surface pieces that follow all of the complexities of the texture. An alternative to the explosion of surfaces would be to use the techniques of texture mapping. Texture mapping is a technique used to paint scanned images of a texture onto the object being modeled. Through an associated technique, called bump mapping, the appearance of the texture can be improved still further.

 

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About Dinesh Thakur

Dinesh ThakurDinesh Thakur holds an B.SC (Computer Science), MCSE, MCDBA, CCNA, CCNP, A+, SCJP certifications. Dinesh authors the hugely popular Computer Notes blog. Where he writes how-to guides around Computer fundamental , computer software, Computer programming, and web apps. For any type of query or something that you think is missing, please feel free to contact us.



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