by Dinesh Thakur Category: Basic of Computer Graphics

CGM stands for computer graphics metafile, which is an international standard file format for graphic images. Most CGM files are vector graphics, although it is possible to store raster graphics in the CGM format. The purpose of creating a standard is to enable users of different systems and different programs to exchange the same graphic file. It is extremely difficult, though, to create a standard so strict that it can work seamlessly everywhere. A CGM file created in one program may not necessarily be read by every other program.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Basic of Computer Graphics

Bitmap: A table of digital BITS used to represent, for example, a picture or a text character, each bit in the table being interpreted as the presence or absence of a screen PIXEL or a printed dot. The principle can be illustrated by the following table, which represents the letter Z as a 6 x 6 table of bits:

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Basic of Computer Graphics

The acronym CMYK (pronounced as the individual letters: CM Y K) stands for the process colors cyan, magenta, yellow, and black. These four process colors are the transparent ink colors that a commercial press uses to recreate the illusion of a full-color photograph or illustration on the printed page. If you look at any printed color image in a magazine, especially if you look at it through a magnifying glass (a "loupe"), you will see separate dots of ink in each of the four colors. These four colors, in varying intensities determined by the dot size and space around the dot, combine together to create the wide range of colors you appear to see.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Basic of Computer Graphics

The processing of a set of data in order to reduce its size. Compression may be performed both to reduce the amount of storage space occupied (say, to fit the data onto a single CD) and to reduce the time it takes to transmit (say, over a slow telephone line). Compressed data must be decompressed by reversing the process before it can be read or modified.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Basic of Computer Graphics

Bitmapped Display: Strictly, a display in which each PIXEL on the screen is represented by a BIT stored in VIDEO MEMORY which would limit its applicability to black-and-white images only. More frequently used, however, to describe any display in which each pixel corresponds to a byte or word in video memory, which covers all contemporary computer colour displays. The term was coined in distinction to the now-obsolete VECTOR DISPLAY, which drew lines instead of pixels.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Basic of Computer Graphics

CODEC is a shorthand way of saying "compressor/decompressor." It refers to a variety of software products that determine how a movie file, such as QuickTime, should be condensed, or compressed, to save space on the hard disk and to make the movie run faster. You might choose a different CODEC for video images than you would for still photography images. The different choices strike a different balance between picture quality and the size of the file (how many megabytes it requires to store it on the hard disk).

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Basic of Computer Graphics

An EXPANSION CARD that enables a personal computer to create a graphical display. The term harks back to the original 1981 IBMPC which could display only text, and required such an optional extra card to 'adapt' it to display graphics.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Basic of Computer Graphics

Also known as vector graphics, object-oriented graphics are shapes represented with mathematical formulas. (This is very different from bitmapped graphics, in which the image is mapped to the pixels on the screen, dot by dot.)

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Basic of Computer Graphics

Bitmapped Font, Bitmap Font: A character FONT in which each individual letter form is stored as a table of PIXELS (a picture), in contrast to an OUTLINE FONT where each character is stored as a set of lines or strokes (a description of how to draw the character). Bitmapped fonts are fast and easy to RENDER onto a screen or printer - by simply copying the bits for the character - and for this reason were preferred on older computer systems (up to and including MS-DOS PCs) that used CHARACTER-BASED displays.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Basic of Computer Graphics

Bump Mapping: An extension of the technique Of TEXTURE MAPPING to create more realistic 3D images, in which an additional BITMAP (the bump map) applied to a surface contains not colour data but small displacements to be applied to the surface normal at each point. After the image is rendered, these displacements alter the angles of reflected rays in such a way as to convey the illusion of surface relief, even though the surface actually remains completely smooth.

 
About Dinesh Thakur

Dinesh ThakurDinesh Thakur holds an B.SC (Computer Science), MCSE, MCDBA, CCNA, CCNP, A+, SCJP certifications. Dinesh authors the hugely popular blog. Where he writes how-to guides around Computer fundamental , computer software, Computer programming, and web apps. For any type of query or something that you think is missing, please feel free to Contact us.



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