by Dinesh Thakur Category: Basic of Computer Graphics

Built into your computer is a mapping system, or grid, complete with the ability to pinpoint any location or coordinate in the application window. This grid is laid out in the common x,y format-x being the horizontal units of measure starting from the left side of the screen, and y being the units starting from the top of the screen. It's easy to see that 0,0 would be the upper left corner of the screen. Now, if you're only using your computer for word processing, then you have no real use for knowing exactly where your cursor is. But in the painting and drawing world, knowing these coordinates is very helpful-to say the least-and it's essential in a lot of instances. Nearly all graphic and page layout applications give you a separate window which shows the coordinates of where your cursor is located at any given moment. By watching your coordinates you can move, create, shape, or select objects or portions thereof with great precision.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Basic of Computer Graphics

Bitmapped Display: Strictly, a display in which each PIXEL on the screen is represented by a BIT stored in VIDEO MEMORY which would limit its applicability to black-and-white images only. More frequently used, however, to describe any display in which each pixel corresponds to a byte or word in video memory, which covers all contemporary computer colour displays. The term was coined in distinction to the now-obsolete VECTOR DISPLAY, which drew lines instead of pixels.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Basic of Computer Graphics

The acronym CMYK (pronounced as the individual letters: CM Y K) stands for the process colors cyan, magenta, yellow, and black. These four process colors are the transparent ink colors that a commercial press uses to recreate the illusion of a full-color photograph or illustration on the printed page. If you look at any printed color image in a magazine, especially if you look at it through a magnifying glass (a "loupe"), you will see separate dots of ink in each of the four colors. These four colors, in varying intensities determined by the dot size and space around the dot, combine together to create the wide range of colors you appear to see.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Basic of Computer Graphics

Bitmap: A table of digital BITS used to represent, for example, a picture or a text character, each bit in the table being interpreted as the presence or absence of a screen PIXEL or a printed dot. The principle can be illustrated by the following table, which represents the letter Z as a 6 x 6 table of bits:

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Basic of Computer Graphics

The processing of a set of data in order to reduce its size. Compression may be performed both to reduce the amount of storage space occupied (say, to fit the data onto a single CD) and to reduce the time it takes to transmit (say, over a slow telephone line). Compressed data must be decompressed by reversing the process before it can be read or modified.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Basic of Computer Graphics

An EXPANSION CARD that enables a personal computer to create a graphical display. The term harks back to the original 1981 IBMPC which could display only text, and required such an optional extra card to 'adapt' it to display graphics.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Basic of Computer Graphics

CODEC is a shorthand way of saying "compressor/decompressor." It refers to a variety of software products that determine how a movie file, such as QuickTime, should be condensed, or compressed, to save space on the hard disk and to make the movie run faster. You might choose a different CODEC for video images than you would for still photography images. The different choices strike a different balance between picture quality and the size of the file (how many megabytes it requires to store it on the hard disk).

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Basic of Computer Graphics

Also known as vector graphics, object-oriented graphics are shapes represented with mathematical formulas. (This is very different from bitmapped graphics, in which the image is mapped to the pixels on the screen, dot by dot.)

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Basic of Computer Graphics

A class of techniques for shrinking the size of a data file to reduce its storage requirement, by processing the data it contains using some suitably reversible algorithm. Compression methods tend to be more effective for a particular kind of data, so that text files will typically be compressed using a different algorithm from graphics or sound files.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Basic of Computer Graphics

The positively charged ELECTRODE that attracts ELECTRONS within a current-consuming device such as an electrolytic cell, discharge tube or valve. In a current-producing BATTERY, the anode is the electrode that receives electrons internally and hence is connected to the external negative terminal.

 
About Dinesh Thakur

Dinesh ThakurDinesh Thakur holds an B.SC (Computer Science), MCSE, MCDBA, CCNA, CCNP, A+, SCJP certifications. Dinesh authors the hugely popular blog. Where he writes how-to guides around Computer fundamental , computer software, Computer programming, and web apps. For any type of query or something that you think is missing, please feel free to Contact us.



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