by Dinesh Thakur Category: Communication Networks

This is very simple optical fiber communication system. In this particular scenario, the optical fiber requires one connection to the transmitter side and another connection at the receiver side. In another scenario when it is required to communicate over long distances where more than one length of fiber cable and other supporting equipment are placed in the system.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Communication Networks

The Ethernet frame is designed to transport packets in enterprise networks by an original method for broadcasting on a local network. This solution gave birth shared Ethernet, in which the broadcast frame is transmitted and where only the station that recognizes the right to copy the information. To this solution dissemination has added Ethernet switching.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Communication Networks

The transceiver exchanges data signals handled by the NIC and electric signals sent over a transmission line. A I5-pin D-SUB connector is used to connect transceivers and transceiver cables. Multiport transceiver supports more than one NIC.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Communication Networks

Half duplex means data can be relayed in only one direction at a time. Two-way transmission is possible, but the transmissions must be alternate. A walkie-talkie is half duplex-when one person is speaking, she cannot also listen A telephone is full duplex-information can go both ways simultaneously; both ends can talk and hear all the time-so does a modem.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Communication Networks

100VG-AnyLan (VG =Voice Grade) is a joint development of AT&T Microelectronics, Hewlett-Packard, and IBM and is standardized by the newly created IEEE 802.12 committee. 100VG-AnyLAN supports Ethernet, Token Ring, and other LAN standards, incorporating a collision less polling technique. It is not that simple as it appears. A router upgrade is required to connect 100VG Ethernet and 100VG Token Ring.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Communication Networks

Parity is a form of "error checking" where the computer checks to see if all the data it was supposed to get really did come through. You will most likely be confronted with parity when you use a telecommunications package to communicate through your modem. In fact, that's probably why you're reading this. The dialog box where you can set the serial port settings always wants to know the parity. The default setting is probably the safest thing to use if you don't know a reason to change it.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Communication Networks

The MAC layer is the "Brain" of WiFi. The first version of 802.11 (the 802.11 legacy published in 1997), defined the MAC layer by incorporating a number of features crucial, such as sharing of speech among users, the terms of network connection, error control or security.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Communication Networks

AppleTalk: A proprietary LAN protocol that is built into Apple's MACINTOSH computers. AppleTalk is independent of the underlying network transport, and is currently able to run over serial cable (LocalTalk) or over an ETHERNET network (EtherTalk).  An AppleTalk port is built in to all Macs.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Communication Networks

Internet access has become a standard feature on most of our mobile devices. But there’s more than one way to connect to the Web with those devices these days. In this article, we’ll help you determine what you need in order to get started with each of these technologies and explain a bit about why you would want to choose one over the other or perhaps go with both.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Communication Networks

From the early 1900s until now, long distance communication has primarily been in the form of the telephone line. Now telephone lines are being used for more than the transmission of voice; they are also used for the transmission of computer data. There are many reasons why someone might want to transfer data between one PC and another using phone lines.



 

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About Dinesh Thakur

Dinesh ThakurDinesh Thakur holds an B.SC (Computer Science), MCSE, MCDBA, CCNA, CCNP, A+, SCJP certifications. Dinesh authors the hugely popular blog. Where he writes how-to guides around Computer fundamental , computer software, Computer programming, and web apps. For any type of query or something that you think is missing, please feel free to Contact us.



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