by Dinesh Thakur Category: Memory

Burst-Mode, Burst-Transfer Mode: A mode of data access supported by many devices – from DISK DRIVE controllers to RAM chips-in which, once the first of a sequence of desired data items has been located, the following items can be retrieved at a faster rate than usual by simply reading from consecutive locations.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Memory

Address

In the Earlier programming Language, a programmer would assign instructions and data to locations in memory, and instructions would refer to absolute locations in memory.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Memory

When personal computers first came out, daisywheel printers were the only type of affordable printer that could print sharp-enough text for important documents like business communications or college papers. Daisywheel printers work by pounding raised, fully-formed letters made of metal or plastic against the paper through a ribbon, just like a typewriter.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Memory

A RAM disk is not really a disk at all-it is memory (RAM, in the form of memory chips) that has been set aside pretending to be a disk. As long as the power is on, you can use a RAM disk just like a real disk drive-you can copy files to and from the RAM disk, display the RAM disk's directory or folder on your screen, and run any programs you've stored there. A RAM disk may be an external SCSI device that looks similar to a regular external hard disk (but is very expensive and is slowed down by the limitations of the SCSI connection), or it may be a lot of extra memory that you set aside with special RAM-disks of software, or it may be a memory card that you add to your computer.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Memory

A cache card is a board you install inside your computer, specifically designed to temporarily store frequently used information that the computer would otherwise have to get from the disk. A cache card can dramatically increase the speed of many tasks because getting information from a cache card is much, much faster than getting the information from a disk.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Memory

The disk controller is circuitry on the computer's motherboard or on a plug-in circuit board that controls the operation of your hard disk drive, floppy disk drives, or both. When the computer wants to transfer data to or from the disk, it tells the disk controller. The controller in turn sends electronic commands to the disk drive making the disk spin and move its magnetic heads to the proper location on the disk. The controller then transfers the data between the computer and the disk drive. The computer's OPERATING SYSTEM and BIOS issue commands directly to the controller to BOOT the computer and to access files stored on the disks. 



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Memory

Fatal error!? Why do they do this to us? Why can't they just say, "Oh, excuse me, but your system has a serious problem. The trouble may just be temporary, and if you'll turn off the computer and try again, maybe everything will work fine."



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Memory

This is a special area of very high-speed memory linked directly to the computer's central processing unit (CPU, the main processor, or chip, that runs the machine). The processor can access information in this cache much more quickly than it can get to data stored in the main memory area. The cache circuits monitor the data used by the processor, keeping a copy of the most recently and most frequently used information in the cache. Since programs are likely to access several items of related data that are near each other, the cache will even try to anticipate the processor's needs by copying data stored near the requested data in main memory. When the processor requests data from main memory, the cache first checks to see if it already has a copy, in which case the cache provides the data. Otherwise the main memory retrieves the data.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Memory

IBM Disc Electronics or Integrated Drive Electronics is more commonly known as ATA or Parallel ATA (PATA) and is a standard interface for IBM compatible hard drives.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Memory

Understanding RAM on a PC gets pretty complicated, especially if you're using DOS instead of Windows. If your system is working okay already, don't bother with this information because it's pretty technical. But if you're running out of memory-if certain programs won't run or you can't create large files-you need some background knowledge before you march down and buy more memory. You may already have enough!



 

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About Dinesh Thakur

Dinesh ThakurDinesh Thakur holds an B.SC (Computer Science), MCSE, MCDBA, CCNA, CCNP, A+, SCJP certifications. Dinesh authors the hugely popular blog. Where he writes how-to guides around Computer fundamental , computer software, Computer programming, and web apps. For any type of query or something that you think is missing, please feel free to Contact us.



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