by Dinesh Thakur Category: Memory

Byte Ordering: The direction in which a computer's PROCESSOR reads the BYTES that make up each WORD stored in its memory. Some machines are designed to read the byte at the lower address first, so that OC 77 is read as OC77hor 3191decimal, while others read the higher address first, so that OC 77 is read as 770Ch or 30476 decimal A difference in byte ordering represents the greatest possible degree of incompatibility, since not only can two such computers not execute each other's programs, but they cannot even agree on the value of any particular instruction or data item.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Memory

The resolution of a printer or a scanner is measured in dots per inch, abbreviated "dpi." If a printer has a resolution of, say, 300 dots per inch, that means in one inch there are 300 dots in a row across, and 300 dots in a row down. The more dots per inch, the smaller the dot has to be, of course. You can logically understand, then, that the higher the dpi, the smoother the printed image will appear to be.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Memory

Expansion slots are the long, narrow openings aligned in rows on your computer's main circuit board (the motherboard) where you plug in add in boards to give your computer new capabilities. The slots are openings within short plastic projections that stick up from the motherboard. The walls of an expansion slot are lined with metal contacts to match the contacts on the add-in board that you insert.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Memory

In the vast majority of pcs sold these days, extended memory is the type of memory over and above the first megabyte (which is the conventional memory). A PC must have at least an 80286 microprocessor (meaning that an 80386 or 80486 will work, too) to use extended memory. But even then, DOS doesn't recognize extended memory-to use it, your software has to incorporate a DOS extender.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Memory

A type of RAM that add ERROR DETECTION AND CORRECTION circuitry to automatically detect and correct a single BIT ERROR in any of the chip. Such errors are often induced, for example, by stray alpha particles emitted from minute amounts of radioactive elements in the chips' packaging.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Memory

A typical hard disk is built right into your computer or is housed in a box nearby-and you never see the actual hard disk or take it out of its container. A cartridge hard disk, though, is removable. It works kind of like a giant floppy disk in that it slips into a slot in a special kind of removable hard drive case (actually, it's more like sliding a video tape into a VCR). A typical cartridge hard disk holds 44 megabytes (there are also 88s), costs as little as $40, and is about as big as a cheese sandwich with no lettuce. The drive (the case) that you put the cartridge into costs from $450 to $1000.But once you have the hard drive, buying a new cartridge is the cheapest way to increase the amount of hard disk space you have.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Memory

A disk drive (or diskette drive, depending on what you want to call the disk) is the part of the computer that takes the disks you insert and spins them. There are many different types of disks, so there are many types of disk drives. The one you will probably see most commonly is the floppy disk drive; actually, all you see is the slot where you insert the disk-the drive mechanism itself is inside the computer. 



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Memory

Density is a term used to describe the type and amount of storage area on a floppy disk. A disk is covered with particles of magnetic 'dust' that can store pieces of data. The larger the particles, the fewer the disk can hold and therefore the less information it can store. On a high-density disk, the particles are smaller; the disk can store more information because more particles can be packed in more densely. High density is not the same as "double density," which is an earlier technology still currently used that packs only about half as much data onto a floppy disk.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Memory

DAT stands for digital audio tape. It refers to a type of tape recording technology, originally developed for music, which represents music on tape with numbers (digitally) rather than as analog sound waves (see digitize and A-to-D conversion). High-fidelity digital music requires a system that can record a great deal of data at high speed, and DAT technology measures up. Since the same requirements pertain to backing up a hard disk, DAT technology has been adapted for use with computers.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Memory

Buffered Seek: A mode of hard disk operation in which a sequence of commands to perform SEEKS operations are collected and executed all together rather than one at time. This saves time compared to non-buffered modes in which one seek must be executed before the next command can be accepted. All modern SCSI and ATA drives have buffered seek built into their internal mechanism.

 

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About Dinesh Thakur

Dinesh ThakurDinesh Thakur holds an B.SC (Computer Science), MCSE, MCDBA, CCNA, CCNP, A+, SCJP certifications. Dinesh authors the hugely popular blog. Where he writes how-to guides around Computer fundamental , computer software, Computer programming, and web apps. For any type of query or something that you think is missing, please feel free to Contact us.



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