You are here:   HomeComputer FundamentalComputer Intro.Characteristic of a Computer
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Introduction to Computer

An operation that calculates the address of the next instruction or piece of data required, performed within the CENTRAL PROCESSING UNIT of a computer.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Introduction to Computer

PDA stands for personal digital assistant, a term for a new breed of handheld computers. PDAs are supposed to combine the power and flexibility of a real computer with the convenience of those little electronic organizers- the kind made by Sharp and Casio-that let you keep track of your names and addresses and to-do items.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Introduction to Computer

A disk has two sides (a top and a bottom). Each side of the disk has tracks or concentric rings on the surface. Each ring is divided like a pie into equal wedges, or sectors, which are the smallest units of storage space on the disk. If one of these units is damaged or flawed, it is considered a bad sector and cannot be used.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Introduction to Computer

If you think of the computer's bus as being a freeway that carries data, then it is easy to visualize the bus width as the number of lanes on this freeway. Naturally, the more lanes available, the more data that can be carried at any given moment. Bus widths are generally designated in multiples of eight; a 32-bit bus width has the capability to carry four times the information of an 8-bit bus in the same amount of time.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Introduction to Computer

FDHD stands for floppy disk, high density and refers to the floppy disk drive in current Macintosh models. This drive can read and write single sided disks (400K), double-sided disks (800K), and high-density disks 0.2 megabytes). It can also understand 3.5" Dos-formatted disks from IBM PCs and Apple II machines. An FDHD is also known as a SuperDrive.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Introduction to Computer

A computer with multiple processors that can all be run simultaneously on parts of the same problem to reduce the solution time. The term is nowadays mostly reserved for those MASSIVELY PARALLEL computers with hundreds or thousands of processors that are used in science and engineering to tackle enormous computational problems.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Introduction to Computer

A terminal consists of a screen and keyboard which allow you to interact with a multi-user computer; the computer itself is often located in another room or even a different building. A dumb terminal, which is the most common type of terminal, has no computing capabilities of its own. You enter commands on the terminal's keyboard to tell the computer what to do, and the computer sends messages back to you on the terminal's screen. The computer does all the work (of running programs, for example), with no help from the dumb terminal.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Introduction to Computer

Bus Master: Any device within a computer that is capable of taking control of the BUS and initiating data transfers with the memory and PERIPHERALS (which are slave devices and can only respond passively to access attempts). In simple systems the CPU is the only bus master, but in others such as the PC I BUS, there may be multiple masters: for example it is common for a SCSI disk controller to be granted bus master status so that it can transfer data to and from memory without CPU involvement.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Introduction to Computer

Bus Locking: A type of BUS architecture in which some particularly bandwidth-hungry device, for example a GRAPHICS PROCESSOR, is permitted to keep control of a computer's bus for many successive cycles to the exclusion of other devices. It was employed in some early Apple MACINTOSH systems to improve graphics throughput, but would be frowned on in today's highly multitasking, multiprocessor environments.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Introduction to Computer

Bus Snooping: A mechanism for maintaining CACHE COHERENCY in MULTIPROCESSOR computers, under which each cpu's cache-control logic watches the external memory bus, looking for reads or writes made by other processors (that is, it 'snoops' on their transactions). Whenever such a transaction is detected, the cache logic enquires whether a copy of the target address exists in its own cache, and if so either writes that line back to memory or declares it invalid.



 

Page 6 of 7



Subscribe To Free Daily Newsletter!

Get Free News Updates Delivered Directly To Your Inbox
About Dinesh Thakur

Dinesh ThakurDinesh Thakur holds an B.SC (Computer Science), MCSE, MCDBA, CCNA, CCNP, A+, SCJP certifications. Dinesh authors the hugely popular Computer Notes blog. Where he writes how-to guides around Computer fundamental , computer software, Computer programming, and web apps. For any type of query or something that you think is missing, please feel free to contact us.



What's New and Popular





Popular Article



Search Content







Advance Courses



Basic Courses



Advertise with Us