by Dinesh Thakur Category: Computer Terms

Clock speed refers to how fast the system clock drives the computer's CPU (central processing unit, the chip that runs the computer) which determines how fast the system as a whole can process information internally. Clock speed is measured in megahertz; a speed of one megahertz (l MHZ) means the system clock is sending out its electric current one million times per second. The higher the clock speed of a computer, the faster the computer can operate, assuming all other factors are equal. However, clock speed isn't the only factor that determines your computer's overall performance, or even how fast the microprocessor (another term for the cpu) gets things done. Two different microprocessors may run at the same clock speed, and still take different amounts of time to finish a given job.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Computer Terms

CD-ROM (pronounced "see-dee rom") stands for compact disk, read only memory. A NON-VOLATILE OPTICAL DISK STORAGE medium based on the same physical disk format as the audio Compact Disc (CD), developed by Philips and Sony. A CD-ROM actually looks just like the CDs we play music with. To use one with your computer, you need a CD-ROM player, also called a CD-ROM reader. A CD-ROM can hold up to about 600 megabytes of information, which is the equivalent of about 700 regular floppy disks. There are CD-ROMs that hold the entire works of Shakespeare, complete dictionaries, histories, images of the works in the Louvre, etc., etc., ete. You can search the CD for the particular information you want to work with, copy it, then paste it into your own documents on your hard disk to do with what you will. You can only read from a CD-ROM, though-you can't store information onto it. The biggest complaint about CD-ROMs is that they are relatively slow.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Computer Terms

A card, or printed circuit board, also known as a board, is a piece of plastic with chips attached to it. Chips are the tiny little circuits that run the computer. You buy a card and stick it inside the computer box. You can get accelerator cards (boards) that make your computer run faster, video cards that give your computer more graphic capability, and clock cards and printer cards or whole computers on a card. They range in price depending on what they do, who makes them, and so on. For instance, an accelerator card can cost $300-$1500.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Computer Terms

Boot Sector Virus: A computer VIRUS program that hides its code within the BOOT SECTOR of a FLOPPYDISK, so that the virus code is executed before the operating system itself has loaded, making countermeasures difficult to apply. Once loaded into memory, such a virus infects the boot sectors of any other floppy disk that is placed in the drive, hence ensuring its spread.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Computer Terms

Boot Record: A set of crucial data written on the BOOTSECTOR of a HARDDISK or FLOPPYDISK that contains the information required by the INITIAL PROGRAM LOADER to locate a copy of the operating system on the disk and load it into memory. Damage to the boot record can prevent the computer from booting from that disk, and render the disk's other contents inaccessible; many disk repair utilities work by preserving and restoring backup copies of the boot record. Some types of VIRUS hide themselves within the boot record.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Computer Terms

Bootstrap: To start a computer by loading its OPERATING SYSTEM from disk storage into memory. The name alludes to the seeming absurdity of trying to lift oneself off the floor by pulling on one's own bootstraps - since it is the operating system that enables a computer to read disks, then loading itself from disk would seem to be a similar impossibility. This paradox is resolved by the presence of a small program called the BOOTSTRAP LOADER, which resides permanently in the computer (stored in a ROM chip) and contains just sufficient code to read the rest of the operating system from disk. This process is informally called 'booting' or 'booting up' the computer.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Computer Terms

Boot Sector The first sector on a FLOPPY DISK or HARDDISK formatted for the MS-DOS operating system, which records the number of HEADS,CYLINDERS and SECTORS per cylinder used on that disk. This information is needed by the disk controller to access data on the drive, and the boot sector is located at head 0, cylinder 0, sector 0, so the controller can always find it regardless of how the drive is formatted. Other operating systems such as UNIX also reserve a special sector for such initialization information, but it is typically in a different form, so one operating system can rarely boot from another's disk.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Computer Terms

Boot Drive: The disk drive of a computer system from which the operating system is loaded when the computer is first started up. Many operating systems allow the identity of this drive to be altered: for example on IBM compatible pcs it is determined by a setting in the machine's BIOS parameter area.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Computer Terms

Biometrics: The measurement of parts of a person's body, for example fingerprints, voice timbre or unique patterns in the iris of the eye, to identify the person for security purposes. Computers can now process such data sufficiently fast for biometric methods to be used in real time as keys to gain access to a system. For example, when a finger is placed on a scanning pad, the print is immediately compared with one stored in a database of authorized persons.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Computer Terms

The B word. If something is wrong with a piece of software or hardware so that it stops working or destroys your data or just acts weird, the product is said to have a bug, or to be buggy. The term actually comes down to us from the real live crawling and flying bugs that used to get into those old giant-sized computers .

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Computer Terms

Bleed refers to any element on a page that is printed beyond the edge of the paper. Whenever you see anything (text, graphics, photographs) that is printed right up to the edge of the paper, it was actually printed onto larger paper over the margin guidelines, and the paper was trimmed.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Computer Terms

Computer products go through extensive testing before they can be released to the unsuspecting and trusting public. When a product has passed the in-house testing stage (see alpha testing), it goes into beta testing, often just called beta. Beta versions of the product are sent out for beta testing to "normal" people who don't work for the company. (These people are then, logically, called beta testers or beta sites.) The beta testers work with the software or hardware in real-life situations and report back the things that go wrong or that need improvement.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Computer Terms

Beep is the generic term for whatever sound a computer makes when it's trying to tell you something. If you press the wrong key or click on something you shouldn't, the computer will beep at you. Sometimes it beeps just to let you know that it has started or finished doing something (like copying a file). You can customize the beep sound in some computers. In particular, newer Macs and pcs with Windows 3.1 come with several sounds you can assign to various types of "events" in the system. Hundreds can be added, and you can even make your own sounds.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Computer Terms

Bandwidth measures the amount of information that can flow between two points in a certain period of time. The "broader" the bandwidth, the faster the information flow. You can use the term to describe how quickly information moves from the hard disk into memory, or from the computer to an add-in board on the expansion bus, or from one modem to another across a telephone line. Depending on whether the transmission is digital or analog, the rate is measured in bits per second (bps) or in hertz (cycles per second).



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Computer Terms

Seek Time refers to how long it takes the read/ write head on a hard disk to move from one track to another. Technically, seek time is only one factor affecting "average" access time, and is not the same as access time. Because it sounds faster, certain disk vendors may try to woo you by quoting seek time specifications for their disks, but you should really base your comparisons on average access time.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Computer Terms

Automated Teller Machine (ATM) Also called a CASH POINT, a combined computer terminal and cash dispensing machine connected via a WAN to a bank's central computers, that enables customers to make cash withdrawals and inspect account details from public sites such as streets, airports, shops and petrol stations. ATMs typically provide a small display screen that presents menus to the user, surrounded by a small number of buttons to make menu selections, and a numeric keypad for entering the customer's PIN number - the latter is checked against that stored on the customer's cash card, which must be inserted into a slot as a means of AUTHENTICATION.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Computer Terms

Application Program

Application Program: Applications programs are programs written to solve specific problems, to produce specific reports, or to update specific files. A computer program that performs useful work on behalf of the user of the computer (for example a word processing or accounting program) as opposed to the SYSTEM SOFTWARE which manages the running of the computer itself, or to the DEVELOPMEN software which is used by programmers to create other programs.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Computer Terms

1.Most generally, the range of values within which an ADDRESS has meaning and can be guaranteed to be unique. In everyday life, for example, each street constitutes a separate address space so that the same number, 12, might be used to describe different houses in Acacia Avenue and Laburnum Grove.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Computer Terms

Machine language is generally referred to as first-generation language, assembly language is known as second-generation language, and high-level languages such as C, C++, Java, etc., are called third-generation languages.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Computer Terms

Artificial intelligence (AI) A branch of computer science that was pursued with great optimism in the 1960s and 70S, in an attempt to make computers think more like human beings. It analyzes data and draw conclusions in a way that makes them appear to be "intelligent." Now of course, computers can't think or do anything without being told what to do. So AI programs use complex formulas which attempt to arrive at an answer in a method similar to how a human might do it.



 

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About Dinesh Thakur

Dinesh ThakurDinesh Thakur holds an B.SC (Computer Science), MCSE, MCDBA, CCNA, CCNP, A+, SCJP certifications. Dinesh authors the hugely popular blog. Where he writes how-to guides around Computer fundamental , computer software, Computer programming, and web apps. For any type of query or something that you think is missing, please feel free to Contact us.