by Dinesh Thakur Category: Memory

Definition: VRAM (pronounced "vee ram") stands for video random access memory or video RAM. It is a particular type of memory used on some video adapters to speed up the display of images on the screen. VRAM costs more than regular RAM (DRAM, dynamic RAM), but it does make the screen snappier. VRAM is the random access memory which is used to store the image and video data which is being displayed by the computer, or you can say that it will serve as a buffer between the CPU (Central Processing Unit) and video card.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Memory

Definition: RAM Disk is also known as RAM Drive. A RAM disk is not a disk at all; It is a program which takes the portion of the system memory (RAM, in the form of memory chips) and uses it as a disk drive. You can create a larger RAM disk, if your computer has more RAM.

A RAM disk can also take the form of a hardware device or a virtual disk. RAM drive makes use of regular RAM instead of accessing the data bus. Sometimes RAM drive also makes use of the compressed file system, so that compressed data can access but without decompressing the compressed data.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Memory

Understanding RAM on a PC gets pretty complicated, especially if you're using DOS instead of Windows. If your system is working okay already, don't bother with this information because it's pretty technical. But if you're running out of memory-if certain programs won't run or you can't create large files-you need some background knowledge before you march down and buy more memory. You may already have enough!



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Memory

In humans, the memory is mind warehouse , where are stored for a later use the various components experience. The memory of a computer somewhat similar but more limited at its possibilities.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Memory

Definition: A laser printer (also known as Page Printers as they prints the whole page at once) represent a real technological revolution. laser printer is a type of printer which makes use of a laser beam to produce an image on the drum or you can say that it is a printer that makes use of a focused beam of light to transfer text and images onto paper. It was first developed by Gary Starkweather at Xerox PARC in 1971. Laser printer makes use of laser technology for the printing of copies onto the paper.

The first relatively affordable laser printers were the Apple LaserWriter and the Hewlett-Packard LaserJet. Prices have dropped like a rock and quality is way up since those machines came out, but the underlying technology remains the same.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Memory

IBM Disc Electronics or Integrated Drive Electronics is more commonly known as ATA or Parallel ATA (PATA) and is a standard interface for IBM compatible hard drives.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Memory

Firmware is a category or class of memory chips which contain information that is permanent (meaning it isn't erased when you shut off your computer or when the power suddenly goes out on a dark and stormy night). The best examples of firmware are theROM chips in your computer that contain programs installed at the factory. Firmware cannot be altered, per se, but in some cases the whole chip can be completely replaced by a technician when it becomes outdated or obsolete.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Memory

Fatal error!? Why do they do this to us? Why can't they just say, "Oh, excuse me, but your system has a serious problem. The trouble may just be temporary, and if you'll turn off the computer and try again, maybe everything will work fine."



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Memory

Definition: DRAM stands for Dynamic Random Access Memory. DRAM is a technical term for a type of random access memory (RAM) that can retain its contents only for a very brief period (measured in milliseconds) and must, therefore, be continually refreshed by reading its contents at short intervals.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Memory

In computer graphics, we used many terms like pixel, dot, resolution, sharpness, Quality of picture. All these terms are used during softcopy and hardcopy output. When we talk about softcopy output, we generally deal with pixels. Hardcopy output considers the term dots pitch for picture quality. Quality of printed media depends upon the distance of dots. Density means; how many dots are located under per inch area. Greater the DPI, more enhancement and focus on the quality of printed media.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Memory

The disk controller is circuitry on the computer's motherboard or on a plug-in circuit board that controls the operation of your hard disk drive, floppy disk drives, or both. When the computer wants to transfer data to or from the disk, it tells the disk controller. The controller in turn sends electronic commands to the disk drive making the disk spin and move its magnetic heads to the proper location on the disk. The controller then transfers the data between the computer and the disk drive. The computer's OPERATING SYSTEM and BIOS issue commands directly to the controller to BOOT the computer and to access files stored on the disks. 



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Memory

The cycle time of a computer is the time required to change the information in a set of registers. This is also sometimes called the state transition time. The register cycle time of a processor is sometimes referred to as the internal cycle time, clock time, or simply cycle time. Main memory cycle time is usually several times the internal cycle time. The internal cycle time may not be of constant value.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Memory

Definition: Auxiliary memory (also referred to as secondary storage) is the non-volatile memory lowest-cost, highest-capacity, and slowest-access storage in a computer system. It is where programs and data kept for long-term storage or when not in immediate use.

Such memories tend to occur in two types-sequential access (data must access in a linear sequence) and direct access (data may access in any sequence). The most common sequential storage device is the hard disk drives, whereas direct-access devices include rotating drums, disks, CD-ROMs, and DVD-ROMs.It used as permanent storage of data in mainframes and supercomputers.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Memory

Memory mapping is the translation between the logical address space and the physical memory. The objectives of memory mapping are (1) to translate from logical to physical address, (2) to aid in memory protection (q.v.), and (3) to enable better management of memory resources. Mapping is important to computer performance, both locally (how long it takes to execute an instruction) and globally (how long it takes to run a set of programs). In effect, each time a program presents a logical memory address and requests that the corresponding memory word be accessed, the mapping mechanism must translate that address into an appropriate physical memory location. The simpler this translation, the lower the implementation cost and the higher the performance of the individual memory reference.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Memory

A typical hard disk is built right into your computer or is housed in a box nearby-and you never see the actual hard disk or take it out of its container. A cartridge hard disk, though, is removable. It works kind of like a giant floppy disk in that it slips into a slot in a special kind of removable hard drive case (actually, it's more like sliding a video tape into a VCR).

A typical cartridge hard disk holds 44 megabytes (there are also 88s), costs as little as $40, and is about as big as a cheese sandwich with no lettuce. The drive (the case) that you put the cartridge into costs from $450 to $1000.But once you have the hard drive, buying a new cartridge is the cheapest way to increase the amount of hard disk space you have.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Memory

Definition: A disk cache (cache memory) is a temporary holding area in the hard disk or random access memory (RAM) where the computer stores information that used repeatedly. The computer can use it to speed up the process of storing and accessing the information much more quickly from the disk cache than if the information stored in the usual place (which might be on a disk or in a part of the computer's memory that takes longer to access). The term disk cache can also refer to a disk buffer and cache buffer.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Memory

Definition: A buffer is Like a cache, that is a data area of computer memory (RAM) reserved for temporary storage. For instance, you've probably noticed that you can quickly type a bunch of commands on the keyboard, and then just sit back and watch your computer carry out the commands one after another. This is because the computer stores the keys you pressed in a buffer-after doing one command; it goes back to the buffer to get the next one in line.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Memory

Associative memory: A type of computer memory from which items may be retrieved by matching some part of their content, rather than by specifying their address (hence also called associative storage or Content-addressable memory (CAM).) Associative memory is much slower than RAM, and is rarely encountered in mainstream computer designs.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Memory

Associative Cache: A type of CACHE designed to solve the problem of cache CONTENTION that plagues the DIRECT MAPPED CACHE. In a fully associative cache, a data block from any memory address may be stored into any CACHE LINE, and the whole address is used as the cache TAG: hence, when looking for a match, all the tags must be compared simultaneously with any requested address, which demands expensive extra hardware. However, contention is avoided completely, as no block need ever be flushed unless the whole cache is full, and then the least recently used may be chosen.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Memory

Hard Disk Access time is the total elapsed time between the initiation of a particular request for data and receipt of the first bit of that data.

Direct access devices (Hard Disk Drive) require varying times to position a disk head over a particular record. In the case of a moving-head disk drive, this involves positioning the comb (head assembly, as in Fig.) to the designated cylinder, plus rotation of the selected track to the desired record. Comb-movement times for a typical medium-sized disk drive are shown in Fig.



 

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About Dinesh Thakur

Dinesh ThakurDinesh Thakur holds an B.SC (Computer Science), MCSE, MCDBA, CCNA, CCNP, A+, SCJP certifications. Dinesh authors the hugely popular blog. Where he writes how-to guides around Computer fundamental , computer software, Computer programming, and web apps. For any type of query or something that you think is missing, please feel free to Contact us.