by Dinesh Thakur Category: Introduction to Java

In the Following Java Example, shows how to Create a Class Using Java Example. in this example we show that Syntax of java object creation is <className> objectName = new <classConstructor>; and the Syntax of defining methods of the java class is <modifier> <return-type> method-Name(<optionalParameterList>) <ExceptionList>



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Introduction to Java

In this Example we Reading the numbers and string in the class Scanner becomes analogous to reading string. In this example, the two numbers are read from the console, results printed on the screen formatted output.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Introduction to Java

We will now make a small program that will input two integers in Java and display their sum. In this program, we will use the methods available in Scanner class to read data typed at keyboard and place it into variables that we specify.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Introduction to Java

Applet: A small program for specific functions, which usually come with the operating system. Examples in Windows are Paint and Notepad. On a Macintosh, examples are Calculator and Scrapbook. The name comes from the term "applications" which is one variety of a software program.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Introduction to Java

The Java RMI comes along with Java JDK l.l and higher versions. It is a true distributed computing application interface for Java. Java RMI is language-specific, and can provide more advanced features like serialization, security and so on.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Introduction to Java

In this section, we will see the implementation of a simplified version of linked list class provided by the Java library. This shows how the lists of operations manipulate the links when the list is modified.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Introduction to Java

You've probably used a computer for work or leisure. Many people use computers for everyday tasks such as check the bank balance or write a school report. Computers are good for these tasks. They can treat repetitive tasks, such as adding numbers or insert words on a page without getting bored or exhausted. Computers are also good for games because they can play sequences of sounds and images, involving the human user in the process.



 

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