by Dinesh Thakur Category: Software Engineering

The shift from traditional to object-oriented environment involves looking at and reconsidering old strategies and methods for testing the software. The traditional programming consists of procedures operating on data, while the object-oriented paradigm focuses on objects that are instances of classes. In object-oriented (OO) paradigm, software engineers identify and specify the objects and services provided by each object. In addition, interaction of any two objects and constraints on each identified object are also determined. The main advantages of OO paradigm include increased reusability, reliability, interoperability, and extendibility.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Software Engineering

In the software development process, requirement phase is the first software engineering activity. This phase is a user-dominated phase and translates the ideas or views into a requirements document. Note that defining and documenting the user requirements in a concise and unambiguous manner is the first major step to achieve a high-quality product.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Software Engineering

Once measures are collected they are converted into metrics for use. IEEE defines metric as 'a quantitative measure of the degree to which a system, component, or process possesses a given attribute.' The goal of software metrics is to identify and control essential parameters that affect software development. Other objectives of using software metrics are listed below.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Software Engineering

For effective project monitoring, the information coming from the development process to the management process should be objective and quantitative data about the project. Software matrices are quantifiable measures that could be used to measure different characteristics of a software system or the software development process.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Software Engineering

To perform testing in a planned and systematic manner, software testing strategy is developed. A testing strategy is used to identify the levels of testing which are to be applied along with the methods, techniques, and tools to be used during testing. This strategy also decides test cases, test specifications, test case decisions, and puts them together for execution.

Developing a test strategy, which efficiently meets the requirements of an organization, is critical to the success of software development in that organization. Therefore, a software testing strategy should contain complete information about the procedure to perform testing and the purpose and requirements of testing.

The choice of software testing strategy is highly dependent on the nature of the developed software. For example, if the software is highly data intensive then a strategy that checks structures and values properly to ensure that all inputs given to the software are correct and complete should be developed. Similarly, if it is transaction intensive then the strategy should be such that it is able to check the flow of all the transactions. The design and architecture of the software are also useful in choosing testing strategy. A number of software testing strategies are developed in the testing process. All these strategies provide the tester a template, which is used for testing. Generally, all testing strategies have following characteristics.

  1. Testing proceeds in an outward manner. It starts from testing the individual units, progresses to integrating these units, and finally, moves to system testing.
  2. Testing techniques used during different phases of software development are different.
  3. Testing is conducted by the software developer and by an ITG.
  4. Testing and debugging should not be used synonymously. However, any testing strategy must accommodate debugging with itself.

Types of Software Testing Strategies

There are different types of software testing strategies, which are selected by the testers depending upon the nature and size of the software. The commonly used software testing strategies are listed below.

                     Types of Software Testing Strategy

  1. Analytic testing strategy: This uses formal and informal techniques to access and prioritize risks that arise during software testing. It takes a complete overview of requirements, design, and implementation of objects to determine the motive of testing. In addition, it gathers complete information about the software, targets to be achieved, and the data required for testing the software.
  2. Model-based testing strategy: This strategy tests the functionality of the software according to the real world scenario (like software functioning in an organization). It recognizes the domain of data and selects suitable test cases according to the probability of errors in that domain.
  3. Methodical testing strategy: It tests the functions and status of software according to the checklist, which is based on user requirements. This strategy is also used to test the functionality, reliability, usability, and performance of the software.
  4. Process-oriented testing strategy: It tests the software according to already existing standards such as the IEEE standards. In addition, it checks the functionality of the software by using automated testing tools.
  5. Dynamic testing strategy: This tests the software after having a collective decision of the testing team. Along with testing, this strategy provides information about the software such as test cases used for testing the errors present in it.
  6. Philosophical testing strategy: It tests the software assuming that any component of the software can stop functioning anytime. It takes help from software developers, users and systems analysts to test the software.

A testing strategy should be developed with the intent to provide the most effective and efficient way of testing the software. While developing a testing strategy, some questions arise such as: when and what type of testing is to be done? What are the objectives of testing? Who is responsible for performing testing? What outputs are produced as a result of testing? The inputs that should be available while developing a testing strategy are listed below.

  1. Type of development project
  2. Complete information about the hardware and software components that are required to develop the software
  3. Risks involved
  4. Description of the resources that are required for testing
  5. Description of all testing methods that are required to test various phases of SDLC
  6. Details of all the attributes that the software is unable to provide. For example, software cannot describe its own limitations.

The output produced by the software testing strategy includes a detailed document, which indicates the entire test plan including all test cases used during the testing phase. A testing strategy also specifies a list of testing issues that need to be resolved.

An efficient software testing strategy includes two types of tests, namely, low-level tests and high-level tests. Low-level tests ensure correct implementation of small part of the source code and high-level tests ensure that major software functions are validated according to user requirements. A testing strategy sets certain milestones for the software such as final date for completion of testing and the date of delivering the software. These milestones are important when there is limited time to meet the deadline.

In spite of these advantages, there are certain issues that need to be addressed for successful implementation of software testing strategy. These issues are discussed here.

  1. In addition to detecting errors, a good testing strategy should also assess portability and usability of the software.
  2. It should use quantifiable manner to specify software requirements such as outputs expected from software, test effectiveness, and mean time to failure which should be clearly stated in the test plan.
  3. It should improve testing method continuously to make it more effective.
  4. Test plans that support rapid cycle testing should be developed. The feedback from rapid cycle testing can be used to control the corresponding strategies.
  5. It should develop robust software, which is able to test itself using debugging techniques.
  6. It should conduct formal technical reviews to evaluate the test cases and test strategy. The formal technical reviews can detect errors and inconsistencies present in the testing process.


 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Software Engineering

Once the software is developed it should be tested in a proper manner before the system is delivered to the user. For this, two techniques that provide systematic guidance for designing tests are used. These techniques are discussed here.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Software Engineering

Having test cases that are good at revealing the presence of faults is central to successful testing. Ideally, we would like to determine a set of test cases such that successful execution of all of them implies that there are no errors in the program. This ideal goal cannot usually be achieved due to practical and theoretical constraints.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Software Engineering

Developing methods that can produce high-quality software is another fundamental goal of software engineering. We can view quality of a software product as having three dimensions:

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Software Engineering

There are two basic approaches to testing: functional and structural. In functional testing   the structure of the program is not considered. Test cases are decided solely on the basis of the requirements or specifications of the program or module, and the internals module of the program are not considered for selection of test cases.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Software Engineering

The V model is useful in every phase of the software development life cycle. This model determines the complex relationship between each phase of the software development and ensures that each phase of software development is associated with testing. Various functions performed by V model are listed below.

 
About Dinesh Thakur

Dinesh ThakurDinesh Thakur holds an B.SC (Computer Science), MCSE, MCDBA, CCNA, CCNP, A+, SCJP certifications. Dinesh authors the hugely popular blog. Where he writes how-to guides around Computer fundamental , computer software, Computer programming, and web apps. For any type of query or something that you think is missing, please feel free to Contact us.



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