by Dinesh Thakur Category: Basic of Computer Graphics

Unfortunately, the concept of graphics of displaying pictures is lot more complicated than what has been described so far - evaluate the points using the equations, store them in a file and use raster graphics methods or use simple line drawing algorithms.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Basic of Computer Graphics

The following are also considered graphics applications

Paint programs: Allow you to create rough freehand drawings. The images are stored as bit maps and can easily be edited. It is a graphics program that enables you to draw pictures on the display screen which is represented as bit maps (bit-mapped graphics). In contrast, draw programs use vector graphics (object-oriented images), which scale better.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Basic of Computer Graphics

The primary output device in a graphics system is a video monitor. The operation of most video monitors is based on the standard cathode ray tube (CRT) design.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Basic of Computer Graphics

A frame buffer is a large, contiguous piece of computer memory. At a minimum  there is one memory bit for each pixel in the rater; this amount of memory is called a bit  plane. The picture is built up in the frame buffer one bit at a time.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Basic of Computer Graphics

Image resolution describes the detail an image holds. The term applies equally to digital images, film images, and other types of images. Higher resolution means more image detail. Image resolution can be measured in various ways. Basically, resolution quantifies how close lines can be to each other and still be visibly resolved.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Basic of Computer Graphics

A pixel (short for picture element, using the common abbreviation "pix" for "picture") is one of the many tiny dots that make up the representation of a picture in a computer's memory. Each such information element is not really a dot, nor a square, but an abstract sample.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Basic of Computer Graphics

When choosing a monitor, one of the factors that the customer usually considers is the refresh rate. A high refresh rate is important in providing a clear picture and avoiding eye fatigue.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Basic of Computer Graphics

Today there are very few aspects of our lives not affected by computers. Practically every cash or monetary transaction that takes place daily involves a computer. In many cases, the same is true of computer graphics. Whether you see them on television, in newspapers, in weather reports or while at the doctor’s surgery, computer images are all around you.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Basic of Computer Graphics

The refresh rate is the number of times in a second that display the data it’s being given. This is distinct from the measure of from rate in that the refresh rate includes the repeated drawing of identical while trans rate measures how a video source can lead an entire frame of new data to a display.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Basic of Computer Graphics

In Shadow Mask CRT tiny holes in a metal plate separate the colored phosphors in the layer behind the front glass of the screen. The holes are placed in a manner ensuring that electrons from each of the tube's three cathode guns reach only the appropriately-colored phosphors on the display.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Basic of Computer Graphics

Resolution refers to the sharpness, or detail of the usual image. It’s a primary function of the monitor & it’s determined by the beam size & dot pitch. The screen is made up of a number of pixels.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Basic of Computer Graphics

As ancient says “ a pixel is worth thousand words”, graphics is essential everywhere to understand the things, concepts, etc easily. Computer graphics is useful in almost all part of our life. In the following sections we are discussing some of the popular areas of computer graphics.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Basic of Computer Graphics

Computer graphics is an art of drawing pictures, lines, charts, etc using computers with the help of programming. Computer graphics is made up of number of pixels. Pixel is the smallest graphical picture or unit represented on the computer screen. Basically there are two types of computer graphics namely.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Graphics Devices

VGA, which stands for video graphics array, is currently the most popular standard for PC screen display equipment. Technically, a VGA is a type of video adapter (circuitry in the computer that controls the screen). IBM developed the VGA for its PS/2 line of computers (the name "Video Graphics Array" is an IBM trademark), but loads of other manufacturers make VGA add-in boards (that plug into a slot in the pc) and VGA chips (in some pcs, these VGA chips are built right into the main part of the computer, the motherboard). A VGA monitor is a monitor that works with a VGA adapter.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Graphics Devices

Vector graphics are stored in the computer as a set of mathematical formulas describing the shapes that make up each image. When you display a vector graphic on the screen or print it, these formulas are converted into the patterns of dots you can see. Because the dots are not specified unit! you display or print the graphic, you can change the size of the image without any loss of quality, and the image will always appear at the highest resolution of whatever screen or printer you're using. The term vector graphics means exactly the same thing as object-oriented (or just object) graphics.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Graphics Devices

Multiscan refers to a type of computer monitor that automatically matches the synchronizing signals sent from the computer's video adapter (the video circuitry). On a standard television-type monitor, the image you see is formed by a single beam of electrons scanning lickety-split across the picture tube. The beam starts at one corner, traces a narrow horizontal line, then moves down a bit and traces the next line. The speed with which the beam travels horizontally and vertically (the horizontal and vertical "scan frequencies"), must match the synchronizing signals from the computer's video circuits.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Graphics Devices

Monitor is another word for the computer screen. But "monitor" encompasses the whole piece of equipment, rather than just the screen part that you look at. You also might hear a monitor called a display, as in "Oooh, I got a new two-page display," or VDT(video display terminal), as in newspaper journalism, or CRT (cathode ray tube), which is the technical term for a picture tube. However, flat panel screens like LCDS are not referred to as monitors, even if they're housed externally from a computer.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Graphics Devices

If an image is displayed on your screen or printed on the page in low-res (short for low resolution), that means you are seeing a low-grade quality. Some graphics are just low-resolution to begin with, such as graphics made in the paint file format at 72 dots per inch. Some graphics are created as complex, high-resolution images, but you may choose to display them on the screen or print them in low-res just to save time, since it takes longer for a screen or a printer to create the high- resolution version.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Graphics Devices

LED stands for light emitting diode. You know those little lights on your computer, usually near the hard disk, that flash while the computer is working? Those are LEDs. They work on the principle of electroluminescence, which refers to substances that glow when you apply electricity. LEDs were used in digital watches, but now all digital watches use LCDs because LCD stakes less power.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Graphics Devices

In a standard television-like computer monitor, an image is produced on the screen by a beam of electrons sweeping rapidly across the surface of the picture tube, lighting up the screen as it passes. Starting at the top, the beam traces one horizontal row across the screen, shifts down a bit and does another row, and so on, until the full height of the screen has been covered.



 

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About Dinesh Thakur

Dinesh ThakurDinesh Thakur holds an B.SC (Computer Science), MCSE, MCDBA, CCNA, CCNP, A+, SCJP certifications. Dinesh authors the hugely popular blog. Where he writes how-to guides around Computer fundamental , computer software, Computer programming, and web apps. For any type of query or something that you think is missing, please feel free to Contact us.