by Dinesh Thakur Category: Memory

Without special help, DOS recognizes a maximum of 640 kilobytes of RAM (random access memory) for use in running your programs. That 640K is referred to as conventional memory to distinguish it from other types of memory (upper, expanded, and extended) that have been invented to overcome DOS'S 640Klimitation. See RAM for a comparison of the different types of memory used in PCs.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Memory

A high speed expansion slot introduced by Intel to speed up 3D graphics operations in Pentium based PCs. AGP provides a 32-bit wide POINT-TO-POINT data channel that enables a graphics card's processor to directly access the PC's system memory, bypassing the PCI system bus and the main CPU- bulky graphics data such as texture maps can be delivered straight to the GRAPHICS PROCESSOR at up to 533megabits per second (Mbps).

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Memory

VRAM (pronounced "vee ram") stands for video random access memory, or video RAM. This is a special type of memory used on some video adapters to speed up the display of images on the screen. VRAM costs more than regular RAM (DRAM, dynamic RAM), but it does make the screen snappier.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Memory

A disk is a thin, circular object used to store computer data (well, the actual disk itself is round, but it is stored in either a square, paper envelope or a square, hard plastic case). The disk goes into a disk drive which spins the disk very rapidly, allowing information to be located and transferred to or from the disk quickly.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Memory

The term dirty ROMS is backwards-derived from the 32-bit clean ROMS that were built into later Macintoshes. That is, they didn't plan to make dirty ROMs. A ROM is a read-only memory chip built inside the computer. It contains permanent and unalterable software to help run the computer.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Memory

Most dot matrix printers have a print buffer, a special chunk of memory for temporary storage. When you print a document, the computer sends out the necessary information faster than the printer can print it. If the printer has a buffer, the information the printer can't deal with immediately goes into the buffer, where it waits until the printer is ready for it. As soon as the entire document is in the buffer, you can use your computer again for other work, while the printer takes its time to print the "buffered" information. The larger the print buffer, the more it can hold and the faster you get your screen back.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Memory

Byte Striping: A technique for speeding up the retrieval of data stored on an ARRAY of hard disks. The data stream is divided up into, say, 4-byte portions, and the bytes from each such portion are written to four different drives: this effectively quadruples the data rate since the four drives can be written to or read from simultaneously. Byte striping is covered by the RAID4 and 5 specifications, and driver software to accomplish it is built into, for example, WINDOWS NT and WINDOWS 2000.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Memory

The speed of a dot matrix or daisy wheel printer (or any printer that prints one character at a time) is measured in characters per second, or cps. A warning: the cps rating that a printer manufacturer puts in an ad is always much faster than the printer's actual speed.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Memory

Data transfer rate (sometimes just called "data rate") simply refers to just how fast data can get from one place to another-"one place to another" meaning between a computer and a peripheral (an external piece of hardware connected to the computer) or one modem to another modem, or even from one internal part of a computer to another internal part.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Memory

The principle form of electronic MEMORY used in computers prior to the invention of semiconductor memory chips. It consisted of thousands of tiny rings called cores, made from a magnetic FERRITE material and each threaded onto three fine copper wires: the whole formed a two-dimensional mesh much like a knitted textile.



 

Page 6 of 8

About Dinesh Thakur

Dinesh ThakurDinesh Thakur holds an B.SC (Computer Science), MCSE, MCDBA, CCNA, CCNP, A+, SCJP certifications. Dinesh authors the hugely popular blog. Where he writes how-to guides around Computer fundamental , computer software, Computer programming, and web apps. For any type of query or something that you think is missing, please feel free to Contact us.



Search Content







Popular Article