by Dinesh Thakur Category: Basic of Computer Graphics

graphical user interfaceis fondly called "GUI" pronounced "gooey." The word "graphical" means pictures; "user" means the person who uses it; "interface" means what you see on the screen and how you work with it. So a graphical user interface, then, means that you (the user) get to work with little pictures on the screen to boss the computer around, rather than type in lines of codes and commands.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Basic of Computer Graphics

Dithering is a trick many graphic applications use to fool your eye into seeing a whole lot more colors (or grey tones) on the screen than are really there. The computer achieves this optical illusion by mixing together different colored pixels (tiny dots on the screen that make up an image) to trick the eye into thinking that a totally new color exists. For instance, since pixels are so tiny, if the computer intermingles a series of black with white dots then you're going to think you're seeing gray.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Basic of Computer Graphics

Aliasing

Aliasing has two definitions, depending on whether you're talking about pictures or sounds.

When a diagonal line or a curved arc drawn on the screen looks as if it was made out of bricks, when it looks like stair steps instead of a slide, the effect is technically called aliasing. Most of us would say it had the jaggies. It can be ameliorated by the technique of ANTIALIASING.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Basic of Computer Graphics

Since large drawings cannot fit in their entirety on display screens, they can either be compressed to fit, thereby obscuring details and creating clutter, or only a portion of the total drawing can be displayed. The portion of a 2D or 3D object to be displayed is chosen through specification of a rectangular window that limits what part of the drawing can be seen.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Basic of Computer Graphics

On a grayscale monitor, each pixel can accept from 1 to 8 bits of data, which will show from 1 to 256 shades of gray.

If there are 2 bits per pixel, there are four possible combinations of on and off: on/on, off/off, on/off, and off/on. Each of these combinations displays a different shade of gray (including black and white).

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Basic of Computer Graphics

If an item is monochrome, that means it uses only one color on a differently colored background. In a monochrome monitor, these pixels have only one color phosphor. The picture is created with, say, black dots (or lines) against a white background. A monochrome image pixel can have two values, on (white) or off (black), and this can be represented by 1-bit as either 0 or 1. Most printers are monochrome, meaning they only print black toner on white paper.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Basic of Computer Graphics

CLUT stands for color look-up table. A CWT is a software palette or set of 256 colors (it's actually a resource) that resides within the system software and most color-capable applications. On a computer with 8-bit color (those that are only capable of displaying a total of 256 colors), a CWT is a necessary reference to let the computer know which 256 colors out of the available 16.7 million colors (24-bit color) it can use at one time. If you think of all those 16.7 million colors as being a big (ok, very big) box of crayons, you can visualize a CWT as being a small box of handpicked colors that someone has handed you to work with. Many applications give you the option of choosing which 256 colors you want to work with. You often can set up your own palette for each particular file. For instance, if you were painting a picture of a man's face, a palette of 256 different flesh tones would be more useful than a palette containing 256 colors found in the range between black and burgundy. Take the time to explore your particular application and its documentation for a variable palette feature.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Basic of Computer Graphics

Bit Block Transfer (bitblt, bitblit): An operation used in computer graphics programming that moves a block of bits en masse from one location in memory to another. If these bits represent display pixels, the effect is to move part of an image from one place to another, and so bitblt is much used in graphical user interface code to display WINDOWS, ICONS and FONT characters quickly. Because this operation is used so extensively, many modern microprocessors provide special instructions to speed it up and a hardware GRAPHICS ACCELERATOR usually contains a dedicated unit called a BLITTER that performs the operation as quickly as possible.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Basic of Computer Graphics

On a color monitor, each pixel has three dots arranged in a triad-red, green, and one blue dot. Each dot can deal with a maximum of 8 bits, which makes a total of 24 bits per pixel. With the possibility of combining the 256 levels of color in each of the three color dots, 24-bit color gives you the awesome potential of 16.7 million colors on your screen (256 times 3). Many of these colors differ so slightly that even the most acute observer couldn't tell the difference between them. Simply stated: 16 million colors is more than enough. (How do you get black and white if there are three colored dots? If all dots are on, the pixel is white; if all dots are off, the pixel is black.)

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Basic of Computer Graphics

CGM stands for computer graphics metafile, which is an international standard file format for graphic images. Most CGM files are vector graphics, although it is possible to store raster graphics in the CGM format. The purpose of creating a standard is to enable users of different systems and different programs to exchange the same graphic file. It is extremely difficult, though, to create a standard so strict that it can work seamlessly everywhere. A CGM file created in one program may not necessarily be read by every other program.



 

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About Dinesh Thakur

Dinesh ThakurDinesh Thakur holds an B.SC (Computer Science), MCSE, MCDBA, CCNA, CCNP, A+, SCJP certifications. Dinesh authors the hugely popular blog. Where he writes how-to guides around Computer fundamental , computer software, Computer programming, and web apps. For any type of query or something that you think is missing, please feel free to Contact us.