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by Dinesh Thakur Category: Data Structure

Analysis of Algorithms (AofA) is a field in computer science whose overall goal is an understanding of the complexity of algorithms. While an extremely large amount of research is devoted to worst-case evaluations, the focus in these pages is methods for average-case and probabilistic analysis. Properties of random strings, permutations, trees, and graphs are thus essential ingredients in the analysis of algorithms.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Data Structure

The function realloc () is used to resize the memory allocated earlier by function malloc () to a new size given by the second parameter of the function. The function realloc(ptr,n) uses two arguments.the first argument ptr is a pointer to a block of memory for which the size is to be altered. The second argument n specifies the new size. The size may be increased or decreased.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Data Structure

1 The process of extracting common properties from particular examples. In programming, it typically means replacing the specific numbers and strings in a particular instance of a problem by variables and functions, so that the same program can solve many problems of the same kind.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Data Structure

The function free() is used to de-allocate the memory allocated by the functions malloc ( ), calloc ( ), etc, and return it to heap so that it can be used for other purposes. The argument of the function free ( ) is the pointer to the memory which is to be freed. The prototype of the function is as below.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Data Structure

The function is used to allocate contiguous blocks of memory of same size during the execution of the program. So, it may be applied for creating arrays of fundamental types as well as structures. The function malloc ( ) may also be used for the same purpose. The prototype of the function calloc () is given below.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Linked Lists

A linked list can be viewed as a group of items, each of which points to the item in its neighbourhood. An item in a linked list is known as a node. A node contains a data part and one or two pointer part which contains the address of the neighbouring nodes in the list.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Linked Lists

The advantage of using Circular Linked List is the last null pointer is replaced and the pointer field of the last node points to the first node, due to this circular arrangement the traversing become quite easier.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Linked Lists

A more sophisticated kind of linked list is a doubly-linked list or a two-way linked list. In a doubly linked list, each node has two links: one pointing to the previous node and one pointing to the next node.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Linked Lists

In a circularly-linked list, the first and final nodes are linked together. In another words, circularlylinked lists can be seen as having no beginning or end. To traverse a circular linked list, begin at any node and follow the list in either direction until you return to the original node.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Linked Lists

A singly linked list is a linked list in which each node contains only one link field pointing the next node in the list.

 

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About Dinesh Thakur

Dinesh ThakurDinesh Thakur holds an B.SC (Computer Science), MCSE, MCDBA, CCNA, CCNP, A+, SCJP certifications. Dinesh authors the hugely popular Computer Notes blog. Where he writes how-to guides around Computer fundamental , computer software, Computer programming, and web apps. For any type of query or something that you think is missing, please feel free to contact us.



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