by Dinesh Thakur Category: Computer Terms

The Desktop is the background on your screen when you're using a Macintosh, Microsoft Windows, and similar graphical user interfaces. The idea is that this screen background is sort of like the top of your real desk, and your program windows are all lying on the desktop in a pile. Some programs may refer to their own "desktops." In this case, the desktop is what you see on the screen when the program is running but no document is open.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Computer Terms

A CD, such as the kind you play to listen to music, is an example of an optical disc. So is a "video disc" (properly called a laser disk), such as the kind you can rent at the video store that has an entire movie on it. Optical discs for your computer can hold an incredible amount of information- up to 6,000 megabytes (which is 6 gigabytes) of data. Entire encyclopaedias, Shakespeare's works, or representations of the art in the Louvre have been recorded onto optical discs.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Computer Terms

An address on your computer is similar to the address on your house it's a way for the computer to know where to send its messages, and a way for the information or the device to know it is being called upon.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Computer Terms

Boot Sector Virus: A computer VIRUS program that hides its code within the BOOT SECTOR of a FLOPPYDISK, so that the virus code is executed before the operating system itself has loaded, making countermeasures difficult to apply. Once loaded into memory, such a virus infects the boot sectors of any other floppy disk that is placed in the drive, hence ensuring its spread.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Computer Terms

You have probably heard of printer ports and modem ports and perhaps ADB ports or some other kind of port. A port is a plug, or receptacle (known in other computer dictionaries as an input/output connector). Once you insert one end of a cable into a port, information can flow between your computer and whatever device is attached to the other end of the cable.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Computer Terms

A serial port is the socket (also known as an "input/output connector") where you plug in the cables to attach to a serial device, such as a printer or modem.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Computer Terms

1.Most generally, the range of values within which an ADDRESS has meaning and can be guaranteed to be unique. In everyday life, for example, each street constitutes a separate address space so that the same number, 12, might be used to describe different houses in Acacia Avenue and Laburnum Grove.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Computer Terms

Bleed refers to any element on a page that is printed beyond the edge of the paper. Whenever you see anything (text, graphics, photographs) that is printed right up to the edge of the paper, it was actually printed onto larger paper over the margin guidelines, and the paper was trimmed.

 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Computer Terms

A device driver is a piece of software designed for a particular device (printer, mouse, monitor, or what have you) and the particular application program or environment you're working with. The driver serves as a go between for the program (or environment) and the device, translating the software's desires into commands the device understands.



 
by Dinesh Thakur Category: Computer Terms

A cluster is the smallest single unit of the space on a disk (a hard disk or a floppy or even an optical disc) that your computer's operating system keeps track of separately. The operating system keeps systematic records of which clusters are occupied by each file stored on the disk (in DOS, this is called the file allocation table, or FAT). Clusters usually consist of more than one sector, a sector being the smallest unit of disk space that the computer can read data from or write data on. There are too many sectors on a hard disk to keep track of them all individually, so the operating system deals with them in groups called clusters instead.



 

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About Dinesh Thakur

Dinesh ThakurDinesh Thakur holds an B.SC (Computer Science), MCSE, MCDBA, CCNA, CCNP, A+, SCJP certifications. Dinesh authors the hugely popular blog. Where he writes how-to guides around Computer fundamental , computer software, Computer programming, and web apps. For any type of query or something that you think is missing, please feel free to Contact us.



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